Marketing’s 2017 #EpicFail

Tony Compton, Managing Director
GettingPresence

Pardon me. I was daydreaming.

I just sat down to put pen to paper and the phone rang.

My Caller ID said it was a Chief Marketing Officer.

I thought I should answer.

Here’s how the call went:

Me: S’up?

CMO: Tony. I just heard you’re gonna write an article about marketing’s epic fail in 2017.`

Me: Yeah. <with chuckle>

CMO: I heard you’re gonna tell everybody that the epic failure is marketing’s utter neglect of addressing public speaking, presentation and personal communication skills throughout the company.

Me: Yep.

CMO: How is that marketing’s fault?

Me: How is it not?

CMO: Haven’t you heard? Marketing is all about data. And technology. I’ve got to chase down every last bit of customer data across every channel of customer interaction and make it work.

Me: I read that somewhere. A few dozen times I think.

CMO: My digital marketing managers are working constantly on connecting with customers on their mobile devices. On the web. Everywhere.

Me: I’m sure they are.

CMO: So, WTF? How do I have this communication problem?

Me: Where’s your next trade show?

CMO: Vegas. Next month.

Me: How many shows and events did you do this year?

CMO: 10.

Me: What’s your trade show budget?

CMO: Over $2M.

Me: How many company staff were in your booth for your last show?

CMO: 20.

Me: Doing what?

CMO: Giving demos, presenting on our booth stage and on the educational platform.

Me: Did you get them ready to speak at the show?

CMO: No, but we offer a two-day presentation training course once a quarter at our HQ. All are welcome, if they get permission and can get there.

Me: So how many out of the 20 at your last show attended the last training course?

CMO: 2.

Me: What about the other 18?

CMO: Don’t know. They’re from sales, product development and service. Not my problem.

Me: Yet it was your show budget, your metrics, your marketing departmental performance.

CMO: You could say that.

Me: So when you have any public-facing event, who’s responsible?

CMO: I am. Marketing.

Me: Webinars?

CMO: Marketing.

Me: Sales Enablement?

CMO: Marketing. But you can’t put that one solely on me.

Me: I’m not. But if you’re truly enabling sales, how is that possible if you don’t know the sales people can speak to your content?

CMO: Dunno.

Me: What about road shows?

CMO: Marketing.

Me: Speaking to media and the analysts?

CMO: Marketing.

Me: Your annual customer conference?

CMO: Marketing.

Me: Getting your customers, executives and partners ready for that conference?

CMO: Marketing. But they don’t want to practice their speaking. They feel they don’t have to.

Me: So I saw that live video stream from your last show. Right in front of your booth.

CMO: What about it?

Me: The marketer you put on camera using that smartphone. Ever do that before?

CMO: No.

Me: It showed.

Me: What about those ebooks you produced?

CMO: What about ‘em?

Me: Did you listen to them?

CMO: Yeah, why?

Me: It’s incredible what you can do with a tin can in a concrete room and a back office.

CMO: They’re good enough.

Me: If you say so. Just LMK if anybody ever responds to those.

CMO: Look, we offer a once-a-quarter presentation training course. What’s wrong with that?

Me: Nothing, if it’s any good. But then what happens?

CMO: With what?

Me: With the effort to help your team with those presentation skills.

CMO: It’s totally up to them what to do. I’m not responsible.

Me: I think you are.

CMO: How?

Me: Where do the people at your company go anytime something’s up with trade shows, events, webinars, road shows, the media, analyst and investor presentations, multimedia, podcast and streaming production, demos, speeches, interviews, customer and partner events, sales enablement, product launches, commercials and mobile video?

CMO: Marketing. But you’re being repetitive.

Me: Similar to the way your staff repeatedly uses the word AMAZING to describe anything and everything your company does? Or repeatedly lifts the ends of their sentences when they talk during a presentation? Sure, I’m grouping it all together but there are subtle differences in all of those examples. You should know that.

CMO: Um, well, I, you know, uhhh… you know, that’s out of my control. Right? We hire professionals who should know how to speak in public before they get here. Right?

Me: Wrong. Michael Jordan was the best in the business. Yet he was the first one to practice and the last one to leave. Yet you offer no such support, practice or initiative to those who want to stay sharp. Even those who already are great public speakers.

Yet you say your full-time job as a CMO is data. And content? But no assurance that the content can really be used by anybody. I still don’t know how you can call that sales enablement. Dumping content on somebody isn’t enablement. Where do your employees go for help with their presentation skills? And I don’t mean making prettier slides…

CMO: Again, we have that presentation training course.

Me: Yes, a one-time generic course that does the basics. If it’s any good. It does nothing to get your team prepped on a regular basis. And once that course is over, the learning largely stops.

CMO: That’s the way it is.

Me: What about your January sales kickoff?

CMO: What about it?

Me: Who’s leading that?

CMO: Sales. Marketing has its usual 30-minute spot on the third day of the kickoff.

Me: Exactly.

CMO:

Marketing’s #epicfail has its origin decades ago.

People have been complaining about rotten, boring presentations for as long as I can remember. Eye chart slides, feature/function and product-centric material.

Speaking in public is people’s Number One fear. 2017 was no different.

In recent years we’ve accumulated more and more business and customer channels of interaction. More sales and marketing channels. Instead of just standing on stage in the 1960s, or in front of a client meeting in the 1970s, we’re now faced with a camera in every pocket, surprise live video, bad content reproduced and repurposed into multimedia formats, all orchestrated by the “good enough” communication culture.

It shows.

To top it off, in 2017 we had the avalanche of mobile video, streaming media, live video apps, interviewers who aren’t, cringe worthy media productions, and wanna-be video producers combined with the supervision of amateur digital marketers who have become even further removed from any human interaction. All chipping away at the branding, reputation and credibility of their companies.

Article after article informs us all that video marketing is now king. The information flood contains infographics on how to use video. The tech trade show session tells everything we need to know about a successful webinar. Except who is on the phone, on camera, on the microphone, on stage and responsible for engaging the audience.

Guess who’s responsible, CMO?

Let’s remember those absent executives who don’t know, don’t want to know, and won’t return until January 8, 2018. Put it all together and you have:

Marketing’s 2017 #EpicFail.

I’d better start writing that article.

For more on Challenging the Status Quo of #Marketing and #Presentation Groupthink, follow me on Twitter: @tonycompton, @GettingPresence

For immediate #presentation & #publicspeaking tips, visit the GettingPresence website.

Confronting the Absurdity in Your Presentation Groupthink

Tony Compton, Managing Director
GettingPresence

When I challenge the status quo of marketing groupthink, I’m challenging you.

In the most professional and positive ways imaginable.

Today, I’m challenging you to stand up to the absurdity found in the #presentation and public speaking groupthink found so readily in every channel of business communication.

At sessions, at conferences, trade shows, and events.

In the boardroom.

During sales calls.

During sales meetings.

On webinars.

On camera.

But rarely on point. Or at least interesting.

Because how many more bad presentations do you and I want to endure?

There are myths behind the absurdity of your presentation groupthink.

And there are truths.

Here’s how I see both of them:

Myth #1: Presentation and Public Speaking rules must be followed.

Truth #1: There are no rules. You can (professionally) do whatever you want. You have an audience. Whether it’s an audience of 1, 10, 100, or 1000 – rock them. Surpass their expectations. Make it a fantastic audience experience. Crush it. And there sure as hell are no rules that state you have to use PowerPoint slides – or any other technology.

Myth #2: Content is the most important part of any presentation.

Truth #2: No it’s not. Content is important, but it’s a distant third behind how a speaker looks and sounds during a presentation.

Myth #3: You don’t need to practice.

Truth #3: Nonsensical arrogance. Michael Jordan was the best in the business, yet he was also known for being the first one at practice and the last one to leave. Not only do you need to practice your presentation skills more than once a decade, so do your employees. Developing public speaking abilities should not be reserved for the C-suite – when and if they do care about this.

Myth #4: Panel discussions are ok.

Truth #4: No, they’re not. Ever. They are lazy, event-fillers. Examine the body language of the panelists from those self-serving panel discussion pictures. From the bored to the uninvolved, it’s a waste of everybody’s time. You have the talent and the creativity. Do something different. Anything less is a clear-cut message of “I don’t give a damn” enough to take the time.

Myth #5: Corporate needs a “compliant” presentation slide deck.

Truth #5: Absurd. Is it more important to provide a security blanket of a slide deck so somebody, somewhere can see a tangible asset, or is it more important to create an experience for your audience – slide deck or no?

I’ve seen this before. You’re doing a corporate event and are given a PPT template so that you can color between the lines for your presentation. Fine. Give them the bare minimum of slides.

If you’re looking to challenge the status quo of your corporate marketing groupthink, cite a good example by looking at the Apple product launches. Minimal to no use of “slides” with good use of video, and a heavy emphasis on the presenters.

I always wonder how Apple can launch their WW products this way yet you have to have an incomprehensible 30-page slide deck to talk about yours.

Myth #6: You have to tell the audience everything you know about our product.

Truth #6: When somebody asks you what time it is, you don’t show them how to build a watch.

Myth #7: Online learning can take the place of practicing presentation and public speaking.

Truth #7: Little bit of leeway here… There are some that will say that online learning suffices. I’ll give them partial credit. It only works after somebody has been doing in-person communication work on their skills and has developed a credible routine. Online can work in remote, consultative settings for preparation, but ideally it’s with in-person, team-based practice.

Myth #8: Turning on your smartphone camera is a great idea.

Truth #8: That may be the last thing you want to do. The saying goes “garbage in – garbage out” applies to video and presentation groupthink. Just because you have the ability to turn on your camera and stream on Periscope or Facebook Live doesn’t mean you know how to build an audience, engage, and hold interest for any length of time. Sometimes a five minute video interview can hurt your brand, reputation, and credibility.

Until you’re absolutely ready with a comprehensive game plan for using video, don’t.

Myth #9: There’s no time for any of this.

Truth #9: Isn’t it funny? You’ll have an audience. Webinar, video, trade show… customers, prospects, media, and analysts. Yet you (allegedly) don’t have time to prepare and deliver an exceptional experience for your audience?

Exactly what business are you in?

Myth #10: There’s no budget for this.

Truth #10: Sure there is. I recently saw a tweeted picture from somebody going home after an BIG trade show. The picture was of two suitcases filled with junk obtained at the show. I estimated the cost of that person’s attendance to be $5000. $5k to attend a show and bring home bags of junk. Somebody approved that expense report. Probably an oblivious #CEO or #CMO.

It wasn’t my budget – or money. But it may have been your #VC money.

There’s budget. Once you start taking this seriously.

Presentation groupthink has produced a global business community of just “good enough” offerings. Good enough sessions because everybody politely claps at the end of a presentation and goes about their day.

Multitasks during webinars that will never truly reveal the audience’s level of disconnect.

Copies one another so that every video interview looks, sounds, and feels the same.

With the same outcomes.

Finally, I recently read a post that highlighted how a handful of Chicago tech companies are developing their sales talent. About how each gets their “pitch” down. But while there’s mention of some very good skills, and a vague reference or two to “training” – there’s not one direct mention of personal communication or #publicspeaking coaching. Nor presentation training. At any of the companies. Some of that may be embedded in there – but the fact that it wasn’t front and center showed one thing: Groupthink. Sales, Marketing, and Presentation Groupthink.

Which is odd. Because while listening is important to any sales situation, so is Talking. Communicating. Presenting. Selling. Across multiple formats.

So the challenge put to you now is to overcome the absurdity in your presentation groupthink.

But you won’t find the answer in the next panel discussion.

For more on Challenging the Status Quo of #Marketing Groupthink, follow me on Twitter: @tonycompton, @GettingPresence

For immediate #presentation & #publicspeaking tips, visit the GettingPresence website.

Challenging the Status Quo of Marketing Groupthink

Tony Compton, Managing Director
GettingPresence

 

The average tenure of a Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) is somewhat short. Two years, maybe three or four. It depends which study you reference. I thought I read it was getting better nowadays. But there’s a long way to go…

Even with the short tenures, CMOs still apply approaches that are:

Outdated. Passive. Common. Routine. Disconnected. Just Because.

Comfortable.

Secure.

of “Careful” Value.

I was going write of “Zero Value” – but that’s not true. There’s some value to what some are doing in marketing. But so much in marketing nowadays simply gets by. And there is value in simply getting by in:

  • Digital Marketing
  • Events and Trade Show Marketing
  • Content and Sales Enablement
  • Product Marketing
  • “Paint by Numbers” marketing leadership from CMOs.

…but simply getting by is not in my nature.

You see it everyday. Fill-in-the-blank marketing. The majority accept, and few challenge. Groupthink. Marketing Groupthink.

That’s how I view far too many approaches to marketing.

Here are five readily identifiable areas that demonstrate marketing groupthink:

1. Digital Marketing

Copy and paste each and every “Digital Marketing” job description easily found populating the ‘black hole’ career sections of corporate websites. And LinkedIn. And others. Digital Marketing has become what? Search engines, keywords, social media maintenance, websites, emails, some writing, some campaigns, some lead gen, some CRM system data upload, some reporting, etc… Your company does it. You do digital marketing the same as the next one, and the next… Why? I dunno. It’s become routine.

Want to challenge the digital status quo? Have your digital marketers put down the electronics and stand in front of the class and tell your corporate story. Or venture out with sales people to talk to customers. Don’t tell me those ideas to marketing groupthink won’t make your digital marketers better at what they do.

2. Events and Trade Show Marketing

Your marketing up to, during, and after your company’s events has become predictable. And safe. How so? Your BIG industry event is coming up. So you pepper your contact db with messages about your sponsored appearance. (So does everybody else.) You promote your event appearance and solicit on-site meetings to drive the appearance of after-show value with high-end opportunities. (So does everybody else.) A sponsored reception, party, or steak dinner may be in the offing. You have your booth. Your paint-by-numbers booth. And you may have a presentation. Or a seat on the ‘cure for insomnia’ panel discussion. Then you (hopefully) dissect your after-show contact spreadsheet to email, call, and solicit. Just like everybody else.

Am I close?

Want to challenge the status quo? Take a hard look at why your company does the events it does. Ask questions. Don’t just take another spot on the show floor and populate it with outdated collateral, spinning PPTs, a ‘cheap’ exhibit, and people who have zero personal communication game. You may also wish to prepare your company speakers before their next presentation. You may wish to turn off your mobile cameras before streaming live video without preparation. Negotiate with event vendors, save money. And leave some of your budget-busting staff at home.

Get serious – and creative – about your events strategy.

This one’s tough. But if you want to disrupt your trade show and event groupthink – you’ll break new ground.

3. Content and Sales Enablement

Content, content, content. Somedays that’s all you’ll read. But it’s the security blanket of the ill-prepared. For terrible slides for unprepared speakers. For endless, text-heavy case studies. For websites that could double as a maze in a corn field.

I’ve never said content isn’t important. But I’ve been around the block a few times in marketing. Content ends up residing on local laptops in all forms known to mankind. Or in a central repository which dates back to 2007. And once the content is retrieved, it’s deflates the person who found it because it’s the same thing Joe used for a presentation in Chicago last week. Outdated messaging and all.

And how exactly is producing all of this “content” enabling sales?

Besides the obvious groupthink approach that sales needs content to be effective?

Want to challenge the status quo? Make sure that those that produce the content can actually use their content. Have them present it as a sales person would: on the phone, on a webinar, in a boardroom, on-stage, and on-camera. It’ll make them better content producers if they experience first-hand how it’s used.

More, it’s wise to make sure that those who are using the content can demonstrate that they, too, know how to use it in multichannel scenarios. (That’s means your inside sales reps and your external business developers. Your marketers, customer service agents, and partners. And your executives.) Be sure to make sure that those who use the content, can use the content.

Because the marketing groupthink approach to content and sales enablement simply dictates creation. And dumping of content. And freelancing of usage.

Of course I’m familiar with sales enablement technology that catalogues content. Customizes content. And delivers content. But that doesn’t mean the end-user in the field can use and present the content. (And those vendors will never tell you that.)

4. Product Marketing

I’ve written about how product marketing could be on the verge of automation. About how it’s become a cookie-cutter endeavor at so many tech companies. I know it’s supposed to be this strategic, go-to-market leadership function, but it isn’t. Not anymore. Not at the companies who copy and paste their product marketing requirements just like the vendor next door.

Follow-me, again, to be sure I got this job’s requirements down: product marketing is to develop strategy, go-to-market messaging, value props, and unique differentiators, have it’s ear to the market, the trends, the competitive landscape, the alliance partners…

Product marketing is to develop content. Draw up battle cards. Unveil material to support business growth. To forecast opportunity. To interface with industry analysts. Understand the buyers. Some subject matter expertise and some public speaking and presentation work.

Toss in a product launch, event, campaign, and marcom support, some sales enablement, with financial and technical expertise, and you’ve got the product marketing picture.

And so does every other company housing one or more product marketers.

Challenging the product marketing status quo is easy. And damn sure should be required.

Last I checked, there are ~5000 MarTech vendors, spanning all imaginable industry sectors. How in the world are you going to break out in that landscape if your product marketing approach is the same as every single competitor? And for those not in the MarTech 5000 – the same question applies. What are you doing differently?

Ideas on how to do so? Sure…

Let me start by saying I’ve seen the problem. Your go-to-market problem. You’ve got good people doing good work with great technology. But where product marketing is supposed to lead, it time and again drops the ball. Change it by:

Preparing your product marketers to regularly visit, present, and interact with customers, prospects, analysts, and the media. Prepare for interactions across all formats. Remote, and in-person. On-camera, on-webinars, and in-person. You’re likely not doing this today. I know because I pay attention. It’s easy to spot. To hear. To see. To read. Get your product marketing communication game tight.

Prepare your product marketing leadership skills. I once sat in on a presentation from one BIG Tech company that was unbearable. They were so proud of a 100+ slide deck but forgot to tell the six remote presenters on a web-conference call how to organize and make sense of it amongst themselves and for the audience. Product marketing is in the leadership role, and took none.

Add creativity. Real creativity. Turn product marketing into storytellers. Stop doing the same events, the same panel discussions, the same public-facing tasks… create a brand for product marketing by doing things differently: creating your own events, podcasts, webinars, videos… separate from the field of product marketing clones. Attack your target audience outside the standard methods of outdated product marketing groupthink.

5. Marketing Leadership

Or should the section be called the “be quiet, accept the marketing groupthink, and just do your job…

It’s the biggest “paint-by-number” and “color between the lines” area of marketing groupthink.

Marketing strategy? There’s a template for that.

The marketing plan? There’s a template for that.

The marketing budget? There’s a template for that.

The approach to events? There’s a template for that.

The quarterly marketing report? There’s a template for that.

The quarterly marketing ops report? There’s a template for that.

The quarterly product marketing report? There should be a template for that.

To marketing videos? Stare into the camera, off-set right, ask softball questions, and overlay graphics.

The approach to webinars and other recorded audio material? Overdo the content, and add one ill-prepared voiceover. Record ‘good enough’ sound to give the impression of using a tin can in a cavernous concrete room.

The leadership approach applied to marketing? So common that you don’t need a template.

Here, I’m busted. You need a marketing strategy, plan, and budget. And you have to report on marketing activities. Those are the current table stakes.

But I’ve sat in those rooms with marketing leaders.

They’re the same leaders who copy and paste last year’s approach to this year’s plan.

The ones who won’t hear of true sales enablement, innovative approaches to content, sales-oriented management styles, and creative, groundbreaking marketing.

Who nod, shake their heads, and clap politely when the next expert dumps useless but feel-good information on them.

Marketing leaders who won’t deviate from standard operating procedure.

Who’ve become infamous for low average #CMO tenures.

This article is over, but I’m just getting warmed up.

I want you to exercise your marketing creativity. Your marketing passion.

And not let it be held captive by a Xeroxed job description or outdated approaches to marketing management.

There are those who accept marketing groupthink. Who want to accept marketing groupthink. No challenges to their way of business thinking allowed.

So you can either smile and go back to your cube, or you can challenge the stats quo.

Challenging means creating.

It means professional #leadership.

It means taking ownership in the business.

Seeing that talent is nurtured.

For ensuring success.

For acting on the need to bring marketing innovation – and professional disruption.

In technology and business practices.

For breaking the business mold and doing something that stands out in the crowded marketing landscape.

To strive for excellence in yourself and those around you.

 

For more on Challenging the Status Quo of #Marketing Groupthink, follow me on Twitter: @tonycompton, @GettingPresence

For immediate #presentation & #publicspeaking tips, visit the GettingPresence website.

The Obliteration of B2B Tech’s Product Marketing Playbook

Tony Compton, Managing Director
GettingPresence

Quick, somebody sell me a pen! There’s a phone number on my TV screen. It’s in a commercial – RIGHT NOW – and I need to write down the number before the 60 second spot is over. I need a pen!

If you don’t know what I’m talking about, watch the film The Wolf of Wall Street and pay attention to the diner scene about 30-40 minutes into the movie. Stick around to the end as the “pen selling” subject pops up for a second time when Jordan Belfort (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) leads a sales seminar. DiCaprio’s character patiently uses the “sell me this pen” line and holds a pen upright as a prop. After the movie, dig up the handful of articles on this subject circulating on LinkedIn and read about the various perspectives on the subject.

As you’ve noticed, I added a little twist to the “sell me this pen” line. Nothing major, I’m still sticking with the original premise which challenges somebody to sell me a pen. Except I’ve admitted the urgent need for a pen. I need one, and want one, now. Yes, for that cheesy, ridiculous reason of writing down that telephone number on my TV. I don’t care the color of the ink. I don’t care if it’s a plastic or metal pen. Don’t care which company made it, or who their competitors are. Don’t care how big or small the pen is. Heck, I don’t care if the ink-filled instrument from inside the shell of a pen has a case. As long it works. Now. A pencil won’t do, I need ink. I don’t have a piece of paper. Just try writing a phone number on the palm of your hand in pencil.

And I’ll pay.

This article’s for those in sales, marketing, and the executive ranks from the ~ 4,900 companies listed in the latest the Martech 5000. (There are 4,891 companies represented in the graphic, with a total of 5,381 marketing solutions.) I’ve seen the graphic in my LinkedIn feed these past several days, along with a number of innocuous comments from my network about the sheer number of companies and solutions represented in the grouping. It’s truly impressive work to gather and produce that visual.

But now, for those in the Martech 5000 mix, try standing out in that crowd. Yes, the graphic is segmented. But even the individual segments are crowded. So, try standing out in your segmented crowd. And competing in it. And selling your software and services. And winning.

The new Martech 5000 graphic was released on May 10, 2017.

For those among the 5000, your current product marketing playbook became obsoletethat very same day.

Here’s why:

1. Yesterday’s Product Marketing Strategic Requirements Are Now Table Stakes

In the arena of B2B marketing technology, the product marketing function behind selling those technologies has become commoditized. Almost something that could be automated. (I wrote an article about it here.) Job description to job description, all those in search of product marketers use the same language to list the standard requirements of the position: technical aptitude, market experience, competitive knowledge, content creation, industry fluency, sales enabler, analyst whisperer, etc. Cookie-cutter product marketing career listings, all. That’s great, except who has time to spend on activities reminiscent of an academic think-tank than an active, aggressive, product marketing effort supporting a daily revenue-generating machine?

In a former product marketing life, I led a global market assessment for my business unit to support strategic marketing plans for an upcoming fiscal year. It was co-managed with an outstanding colleague in product management. Together, we dug into the business unit with our worldwide team from every possible angle, then presented our work and strategic recommendations to executive leadership. When we undertook the effort, we took a year’s worth of fiscal due diligence and made it happen in 90 days. Today, the business of product marketing in B2B technology is moving too fast, too quickly to wait a year. Or 90 days. Instead of a 12-month effort, I’m suggesting that the effort of knowing everything about the marketing technology arena – and the part your company plays in it – is a day-in and day-out ruthless business effort. Not 12 months, not 90-days, but every single day. For those first time product marketers new to a company, I’d allow three months of market and business orientation to get up and running. To fluently know everything that’s required from product marketing to checkoff that commoditized list. Then it’s time to move on to more pressing matters…

2. Launching, Getting to Market, and Differentiating

These performance areas are now squarely on the shoulders of product marketing. It must take the leadership role of setting the strategic direction for marketing, sales support and enablement, possibly the entire company. These deliverables won’t come out of marketing communication. They’re too busy designing websites, printing brochures, and making sure the corporate logo is being used properly. Digital marketing won’t do it. They’re too busy worrying about search engines, keywords, and social media. And the Corporate Marketing VP is knee-deep organizing a customer conference which looks, sounds, tastes, smells, and feels like every other industry gathering since before Ridley Scott’s original Alien movie burst onto the scene in 1979.

Time and again, yesterday’s B2B tech product marketers have notoriously limped across the go-to-market/product launch finish line. The result is that they find themselves adrift – anonymously lost in an expanding ocean of technology vendors. In the same way I can close my eyes and envision the repetitive product marketing job descriptions, and I can close my eyes and replay the countless number of product marketing-led launches and by-the-numbers offerings that bleed together and fade into the background noise of the industry landscape. It’s unfortunate. Product marketers who know they have good technology, who are well-versed in the feature/functionality of their products, who can provide a roadmap in the blink of an eye and relay stories about the delivery models at their disposal, but – when the time comes to go-to-market – the routine falls flat. The ability to crush the last mile to the market escapes them. Yesterday’s product marketers all employ the same set of activities: boring launch decks, text-heavy webpages, routine road shows, run-of-the-mill webinars, overview demos, predictable content, minimal sales enablement… It’s all driven by the outdated product marketing playbook and its strategy of May 9, 2017. That leads us to…

3. When Marketing Leads are in Stage 31a of the Pipeline, Sales Couldn’t Care Less.

I hope that section title captures the spirit of this section. Because while product marketing obsesses over which marketing lead is in which pipeline stage, and whether or not the lead is being subjected to the correct piece of product marketing-generated content, and if that content is being delivered by the mandatory piece of non-integrated CRM or marketing automation technology… By the time you try to explain all that to sales, they’ve disconnected. Long ago.

Forget that. Sales has to sell. It wants Product Marketing to get to work and do something to help. Anything, meaningful, that helps beat the competition — today.

Experienced inside sales people and external business developers have heard it all before from product marketing. Sales is grinding it out every hour of every day trying to hit their numbers and product marketing continues to preach of enablement, content, and technology from the ivory think tank. Yet after a decade of listening to the promises of all of the above, the song does remain the same. Content goes unused. Enablement sometimes can be nothing more than a stack of electronic stuff uploaded to an internal server. And while bought and paid for technology goes unintegrated, more and more and more vendors try to sell more and more software and services to an uninterested audience of skeptical buyers. Meanwhile, we see the competitive landscape growing.

Yesterday’s commoditized product marketing is in over its head. Sales knows this.

May 9th’s playbook is merely the opening chapter to May 10th’s revision.

Which means…

4. Yesterday’s Product Marketer Can’t Sell Me that Pen

Or software. Or professional services. Or managed services.

Even with an immediate need. Even with money on the table.

The creativity just isn’t there. It’s not there in mediocre presentations. It’s not there in road shows, events, and trade show booths that are long in the tooth with outdated messaging. It’s not there in illegible and outdated websites. In widespread poorly produced sales enablement content. In lackluster market launches lost in a congested world. In siloed, unused technology.

The sales grinder mentality isn’t there. When product marketing never accompanies sales to visit customers or prospects, the grinder mentality isn’t there. When product marketing is missing at the end of the quarter when contracts are due and revenue is counted, it’s not there. And when product marketing doesn’t participate in weekly sales meetings and doesn’t earn the immediate respect of the sales unit, it’s certainly not there.

The true enablers aren’t there. Content is only a modest piece of the sales enablement puzzle. Today’s overwhelming focus is on content, and the technology to delver that content. But can somebody tell me who is responsible for ensuring that the sales people who use the content are able to use the content? To communicate it effectively? To stand and deliver value props – without technology? To have and share a Point of View? To influence, motivate, and generate new business in front of a crowd? Or an executive boardroom?

The executive oversight isn’t there. I see too many corporate representatives (sales, marketing, executives) fumble their way onto the industry scene: poor stage presence at events, sleep-inducing webinars, mundane interviews, bad public speaking efforts. The other day I saw a video from a random trade show booth at a recent event. It was an interview. At least I think it was. Only I don’t think the interviewer or the person who was interviewed had ever done anything like that before. Product marketing should be on top of that before that ever happens. And so should executive management. It should be in the new playbook. Instead, the company will have to live with the filler-language filled interview with head-scratching content – forever.

I don’t remember the exhibitor’s name. I turned off the video after about 10 seconds. The participants didn’t appear as if they were happy to be there. Or really wanted to be there. Or knew what they were doing. Yet it was on-camera for all the world to see.

Why would anybody want to watch that? How was this acceptable to broadcast?

Yesterday’s product marketers could never sell me that pen. By the time they would finish showing me slides about the different colors of the pen and its various inks, and the comparison charts contrasting competing pens, they’d turn over the conversation to a salesperson enabled with case study content from 2013. Meanwhile, my TV commercial is over. Revenue lost.

Make no mistake about it, product marketing is responsible for breaking through and standing out in the sea of the Martech 5000. They, too, are also in sales whether they want to admit it or not.

The product marketer seeking to compete and win in all facets of the B2B tech game can’t be successful working off a playbook designed for a by-gone era. The new playbook must incorporate the old, while adding new game plans for true enablement, breakthrough product launches, sales toughness, revenue partnership, creative and effective personal communication, distinguished go-to-market efforts, and effective measurement.

Not only will today’s product marketers need to know how to effectively market and sell me that pen, they’ll also need to know how to cross-sell me on a blank sheet of paper. To do so, they’ll have to learn how to sit and interact with customers. And that’s not happening in the office.

The opportunity is outside, and so are those other 4,900 companies looking to put you out of business.

Get after it.

Movie Spoiler: Leonardo DiCaprio’s character doesn’t use any PowerPoint slides in The Wolf of Wall Street to help teach people how to sell that pen. At least not right away. Maybe he used some slides after the credits roll, but my guess he didn’t try to cram 100 proudly-developed, officially-sanctioned product marketing slides into a one-hour presentation.

Visit: http://www.gettingpresence.com, or email: info@gettingpresence.com

Exposing a CMO’s Worst Fears

Tony Compton, Managing Director
GettingPresence

I can’t sing. Not yet, anyway. I suppose if I apply myself to a few singing lessons, I may be able to work my way through a few tunes. Country music, or tunes with a lot of Issac Hayes-type soul, perhaps… Sure, I can sing along in my car to my favorite songs from The Police to The Monkees, and I even mouthed along to an all-too-appropriate Tom Petty song while driving on a sunburnt Interstate 75 in Northern Florida yesterday afternoon, but still, I’m challenged in the singing department. For now.

A few years back, my then-girlfriend and I caught a New York City Broadway performance of The Mystery of Edwin Drood at Studio 54. (The famous 70’s club has been converted into a theater.) As expected, it was a outstanding production, and the performances were phenomenal. What struck me the most is how the actors could voice an appropriate British-accent (they’re not all the same, you know) and sing at the same time. And not just sing, sing well. Broadway performance in Midtown Manhattan well.

Days after the show, I mentioned this to friends when one innocently stopped me and said “That’s what Broadway actors do. They’re trained. They practice and prepare for their performances.” A spot-on observation, and I applied that to the working world of marketing.

Because so much is expected out of marketing, yet so little is done to ensure a world-class, top caliber performance in each and every aspect of the department. And exposing this is exposing a marketing leader’s worst fears.

Broadway actors are never, ever, just thrown out on the stage, yet it’s done to marketers all the time. In more ways than one:

1. Public Speaking and Presentations

Ok, way too obvious, but this topic works in the lead-off spot. Chief Marketing Officers are so damned worried about digital this, and content that… That the key element of a marketer’s ability to stand and deliver messages and value props – without electronics – is never coached, trained, or nurtured. Yet all are expected to deliver world-class audience grabbing performances when they take stage. Any stage. But without adequate practice and preparation, how is this supposed to happen?

By the way, the power went out at 7:00 am in my Central Alabama business class hotel this morning, It was out for over an hour. If your marketers had a meeting with a prospect or customer this morning at 8:00 and had to present in a dimly sunlit room with no slides, tablet, smartphone or laptop, what would they do? How effective would they be on their own – on the fly? Would they bag their performance, use the obvious excuse, or still nail it?

2. Voice and Video Production

You read about the dominance of video marketing and hear about it every day. And now you’re treated to the daily drip of stories that highlight how ‘voice’ is the new User Interface.

I don’t have to look, and I can cover my ears to know that your marketing leadership and your internal teams are totally unprepared for either.

Somehow, somewhere, amateur hour has taken over and it that reminds some of the way Kinescope was used in the early days of television.

In plain language… It’s unacceptable to thrown garbage in, and expect audience-grabbing, lead-generating, groundbreaking programming to come out on the other side. No, it’s not acceptable to put two people in an echoing back office and stick them on camera. No, it’s not acceptable to put a boring four-person panel discussion on a streaming media feed and expect people to watch. No, it’s not acceptable to throw digital marketers at a problem when they’re concerned with keywords and search engines and have zero experience coaching talent.

And, no, you’re not going to want Siri, or Alexa, or whatever generic voice Apple, Amazon, Google, Samsung, Microsoft, or Facebook offer to vocally represent your business.

Sticking somebody from your marketing team in the back office with a smartphone camera and its microphone headset won’t cut it. It never did, and it never will.

Video and voice are here to stay at the center of your marketing efforts. They impact everything from Product Information Management to the Customer Experience; from branding, lead generation, data gathering and usage, to marketing, communication, service, and customer loyalty; and from strategic investments, to financial management, to corporate profitability.

3. Sales Enablement

Instead of “Love and Marriage” Frank Sinatra could have sung an updated version of his Married with Children theme song using “Marketing and Sales Enablement”. (Although the syllables are way off. I can’t get it to work with the music in my head.) But you get my point. How are marketers expected to enable sales without understanding what salespeople need and want to be enabled, efficient, and effective? Meaning… marketers aren’t spending time with salespeople in the field. Hell, they hardly spend time with them in the office. And if the entire operation if virtual, forget it. Disconnected marketers sitting in a room somewhere cut-off from the daily sales efforts of people grinding it out is a recipe for disaster. Yet, marketers are supposed to be great sales enablers? How? When exactly does this transformation take place? Again, marketers are thrown ‘out there’ and into sales enablement with unrealistic expectations.

4. Digital Marketing

This one I’ll take in reverse. Just as you’ve seen widely-used, common job descriptions for ‘product marketing’ positions, and the often-published stories of video and voice dominance, now comes the onslaught of ‘digital marketing’ careers. But there are two problems with this. One, digital marketing positions usually aren’t just digital marketing positions, and two, if any positions are truly just digital marketing positions, those people are in trouble. Big trouble.

In my experience, ‘digital’ marketing will inevitably include some, if not all of: lead and revenue generation, creative writing, sales enablement, managing trade shows and events, managing marketing automation, social media and CRM systems, leading internal meetings, staff supervision, recruiting, interviewing, hiring, training and coaching, content production, public speaking, financial management, departmental strategy, product launches, media and analyst relations, etc… Of course nobody is preparing digital marketers to handle much of that list – one that barely scrapes the surface.

Calling somebody a digital marketer nowadays is largely inaccurate. Their work will encompass more than heads-down Internet and social media work on a laptop. But it seems as if labeling marketing positions as merely ‘digital’ is the new hip comfort zone of HR everywhere.

They’re wrong. And preparing nobody for all that those ‘digital’ positions require.

Maybe I’m blowing this out of proportion. The many discrepancies in how marketing is being handled today don’t really need to be pointed out to expose a CMO’s worst fears. It’s not that the marketing team hasn’t been prepared to be public speakers or outstanding presenters, or that they’re not up to the physical, creative, or technical demands of streaming video production, event management, and vocal user experiences. It’s not the unreasonable expectation that marketers are automatically supposed to be sales enablers in a vacuum or that digital marketing is more of a title-in-name-only function.

I think exposing a CMO’s worst fear would be to secure a speaking spot on a Broadway stage and ask for a two hour performance, without the opportunity to rehearse. No prep, practice, rehearsal before going on stage. In fact, this is a good way to expose the worst fear of most anybody on the executive, board of directors, and investment teams.

After all, if a marketer can be thrown into any one of a number of situations without adequate preparation, practice, coaching, training, rehearsal, or resources before being expected to crush a task or performance, why shouldn’t senior leadership be expected to do the same?

Somethings can be outsourced, but marketers are being sorely short-changed by companies when its employees are not afforded the investment and opportunity to do their jobs well.

No Broadway actor would take the stage and sing without daily hard work and preparation.

No senior-level executive would give a speech or presentation without practice and rehearsal.

But marketing is expected to perform at equally high levels with little or no help, across-the-board, in numerous assignments.

While you think about that, I have to hit the road. It’s a beautiful day in the Southern USA, and it’s time for the open road and some traveling music.

And another chance to work on my singing voice…

Visit: http://www.gettingpresence.com, or email: info@gettingpresence.com

Your Words, Your Voice, Your (Lack of) Credibility

Tony Compton, Managing Director
GettingPresence

#Content isn’t the most important part of your next presentation. It’s how you look, and it’s how you sound. Not how your slides look. Not how your handouts look. Not how your pre-recorded demo sounds. And it’s certainly not the furniture selection for your next six-person sleep-inducing panel discussion.

Yes, content is important. But it’s how you look and sound as a presenter that makes the difference.

It’s the how you sound portion that’s the focus of attention in this post.

When I hear a somebody in a presentation, video, podcast, or interview who employs poor speech habits and a substandard vocabulary, bad impressions are made. Impressions of not being prepared, of not being well versed in content, of being evasive, uncertain, and uncaring. Uncaring to give an audience the best possible effort in being ready for a business appearance.

Say these, and risk your #business credibility:

1. Filler Words

You’ve read about filler words. You’ve also heard them, and about them, for as long as you can remember. The global epidemic of their usage continues, so here’s more ammunition for the professional bombardment asking, begging, and telling people to stop, breathe, and think before uttering another filler word.

Filler words are the “umms, uhhs, I mean, I think, well, look, and you knows” which permeate the vast majority of the spoken part of presentations, webinars, demos, corporate videos, sales pitches, panel discussions, speeches, meetings, interviews, conference calls, and regular old business conversations each of us experiences every day. Filler words are worthless.

How to get rid of them? Before you say anything, breathe deeply and think. Think about what you’re going to say. Then crank up the volume of your voice. Speak with volume, emphasis, and conviction. (I’m not taking about yelling.) When you do these things, your filler words will disappear. Try it. Bob and Eileen Parkinson taught me this years ago. Still works today. It’ll always work – no matter the venue, format, or environment of your next presentation, speech, conference call, or meeting. Practicing this vocal technique will serve you well.

Want to have some fun with this one? Here’s what I do… Count the number of times a presenter uses filler words during a presentation. Silently count on your fingers and toes. Chances are good you’ll run out of appendages within four or five minutes. It may take longer, but I’ve seen and heard filler words accumulate much, much faster.

Even more fun would be to take any recorded business presentation and edit out the legitimate corporate content. Leave the filler words and run them together in one long voice track. Over the course of a 60 minute presentation the net result may be several minutes of filler language that did nothing for the audience. Look at it as several minutes that could’ve been better spent delivering value to an audience.

2. Go and Like

The word is said. Not go – or went.

As in “…and then I go, You should be more careful when you cross the street…”

Or “… and then I went, You should be more careful…”

Or “…then he goes, We should get a bigger boat…”

You didn’t go anywhere. He didn’t go anywhere. You said something.

Same for the word “like” in conversation.

As in “…I was like, You really needed a bigger boat.”

Nobody was like anything. Somebody said something.

You may have to verbalize those lines in your head in your favorite ‘daydreamer’ accent, but you’ll get the drift. Eliminate the annoying misuses of the words go, like, and their derivates.

If you said something, say that you said something.

Or it’ll be, like, whatever

3. Amazing

The award for the most annoying overused word in the English language goes to the word amazing. Dinner was amazing. The performance was amazing. The interior of that refurbished house is amazing. We had an amazing time. It all turned out to be amazing. The word has been overused to the extent that it’s lost all meaning. Pull up your thesaurus and find an alternate.

4. Going Forward

This short phrase is gaining traction, and that’s not a good thing. Remember the next time you are treated to something along the lines of, “Going forward, our new CEO will seek to grow the business.” Or, “Going forward, the new coach will take the team in a new and exciting direction.”

Going forward? As opposed to what? Going backward? Or sideways? Unless a time machine is hanging out in the office, you’re always going to be going forward.

5. Background, History, Review, Overview, Timeline…

Your company’s Founder may have been a nice, no-nonsense business person born in the late 1800’s. And I’m sure times were tough when your company’s first product was launched in 1901. But nobody is attending your presentation to see black and white pictures of your company history, a timeline of the last 100 years, pretty pictures of your corporate campus, or anything that has anything to do with sleep-inducing topics entitled background, review, history, and the rest… If you want to get an audience to tune out and drop out from the jump, include the words Summary and Review with those already listed and you’ll be on your way to nap time.

Here’s one tip for today: Record your next presentation, speech, or webinar, and hear what your audiences hear. Listen to yourself.

I once worked with a VP who was a bright, articulate, and experienced executive. But his continual usage of the phrase “you know” during his presentations severely undercut his credibility. I also worked with another senior executive who liberally used a variety of filler words during an interview. It didn’t help that the interviewer didn’t prepare his communication skills, either. If only these former colleagues could hear what the rest of the world could hear, maybe they would’ve prepared for their vocal skills for their future business presentations. Why they didn’t take their vocal skills seriously remains puzzling.

So record yourself, listen, and analyze. You’ll start to notice where you can improve your vocal skills, credibility, and overall communication abilities. Most people don’t do this. It’s either out of fear, arrogance, or pure laziness that they don’t. Enjoy knowing that when you record and improve your vocabulary and vocal skills, you’re strengthening a significant business advantage for yourself.

Here’s a bonus tip about what not to do, and what not to say. If you’re giving a presentation or speech in a setting where you’re wearing a wireless microphone, remember when you have that microphone on your person. In the aftermath of a presentation, a couple of speakers have forgotten that they’re still wearing a microphone. Some have been known to trash talk other presenters while still wearing a microphone. One story even recalls how a presenter took a live wireless microphone into the men’s bathroom after a presentation. I don’t know if any of that was recorded, but it might’ve been.

Always know where the microphones are, promptly remove any microphone from your person after a presentation, and always treat any microphone as if it’s turned on.

In public speaking, presentations, and event management, there’s no substitute for experience.

Visit: http://www.gettingpresence.com, or email: info@gettingpresence.com

United Has Plenty of Company in Playing it Cheap

Tony Compton, Managing Director
GettingPresence

The damage is done.

United’s brand and reputation have been irreparably harmed for a generation, at minimum.

Once upon a time I was a #United frequent flyer. I think I have over 400k lifetime miles on the airline. I’m not 100% certain of that number because I haven’t flown United since last summer, and I just don’t feel like checking my UA frequent flyer account. And for this #Chicago born and raised traveler, I can’t say I was totally surprised to learn about what had happened with one of their passengers. Shocked, angry, disgusted… yep. Surprised? Not really.

The world now knows what far too many ORD flyers have known about United for years: the airline is – to say the least – operationally challenged. The way it has served its customers has been deteriorating for years and I’d given up on United, flying them only when absolutely necessary.

Then this incident in Chicago happened.

No doubt you’ve heard about the firestorm that has engulfed United Airlines this past week. But this post isn’t a rehash of the events that transpired this past Sunday. It’s an article that examines one specific element within the sequence of events that got the airline to where it finds itself today. One particular business aspect of the rotten customer experience that United executives and investors surely wish they could get back. It’s one that was controllable, would have made economic sense, and one that United CEO Oscar Munoz would go back in time to retrieve if given the opportunity. But that ship sailed on Sunday, and now it’s too late.

I’m talking about the $800 (USD) ceiling that was the cutoff between the final offer from the airline to entice volunteers to stay the night in Chicago and the start of the passenger selection and eviction process which led to the physical incident with Dr. David Dao. The compensatory offers from the airline to the passengers on that Chicago to Louisville flight should’ve increased. Eventually some passengers would’ve taken a higher amount to give up their seats. Even if they had to get to their final destination, a few may have (or should have) put on their thinking caps and ran the numbers: $800 (or more) minus a one-day car rental to Louisville – minus gas – equals profit for themselves. Even if that profit came in the form of a voucher for future United travel. The drive from Chicago-O’Hare to Louisville is only five hours, and I’ve driven it many, many times. It’s a piece of cake. But I digress…

The point is that United played it cheap with its passenger offers, and it’ll cost the airline exponentially more than the small amount of extra funds it would’ve taken to get one of its Louisville-bound customers to accept an offer for their seat. Sad part about it is United isn’t alone in playing it cheap. Far from it. They have plenty of company across all industries in the form of other organizations which think it’s either perfectly acceptable to gamble with certain business situations, not invest in critical areas of their business, remain ignorant or stubborn in their corporate arrogance, and conduct business as usual with their heads in the clouds.

Until it’s too late.

From a #sales, #marketing, #technology, and #socialmedia perspective, here’s how:

1. Professional Development

Employees are continuously asked to write, present, and communicate. Market, sell, and service customers. To organize and run meetings, lead teams, resolve problems, and perform at a high level. But when it comes to provide professional business coaching for any of the above, most companies fall short or offer their employees nothing at all. Yet employees are thrown into situations when they’re either not equipped for success or nothing has been done to maintain and upgrade their skills. And for those who claim that employees should have certain professional skills when they’re hired and that they don’t need to provide additional support… I’m certain Michael Jordan knew how to play basketball before joining the Chicago Bulls. Tiger Woods knew how to play golf before and after he won his first Masters tournament. Yet they always had coaches to improve their games. They were at the top of their games and still needed coaching and practice. All companies should do the same for their employees. (And no, those once-a-year two day cookie cutter training sessions don’t suffice.)

When is it too late? Every time a speaker is ill-prepared for a presentation, a rep isn’t prepped for a customer interaction, a webinar unfolds with a lackluster approach, a time-wasting team meeting is held, a company’s brand and reputation are damaged.

2. Trade Show Sponsorships and Exhibits

A juicy Silver-level sponsorship at the next industry event is secured. Not platinum, nor Gold, but it includes a 10’ x 10’ booth location in a decent, but not great, area within the exhibit hall. But beyond the initial sponsorship investment, not much is done by the sponsoring company to succeed at the event. A homemade booth, constructed by a combination of sales, marketing, and office staff who should be doing something far more productive occupies the exhibit space. Poor exhibit messaging, no staff preparation, and five-figures of investment flushed down the toilet. And the sponsoring company wonders why the attendee world didn’t come running to their exhibit? Corporate damage at an event, complete.

When is it too late? Most likely weeks or months before an events starts, but certainly one minute after the exhibit hall doors open.

3. Live from… Trade Shows, Conferences, and Events

The ongoing frustration with inept speakers giving bad, text-and-tech heavy presentations has been a cross-industry plague for decades. Today, lousy presenters aren’t confined to the ballroom. Everybody walks the convention hall and its exhibit hall floor with a video camera and mobile TV studio in their pockets. Show attendees will put your naive employees on live television on a moment’s notice – with disastrous results. I’ve seen it happen and that content lasts forever. If each and every one of your event-bound staff are not fully prepared for how they will be seen and heard on-camera, a company is gambling with its brand and reputation.

When is it too late? As soon as somebody hits that camera button on their smartphone or tablet and streams live, from your booth, demo, or event session.

4. Voice, Video, and Media

Some companies place little value in the voice of their corporate content. I’m talking about the actual voice that is used to voiceover company productions that can range from ebooks, to demos, to radio and TV commercials, to event videos. More, some companies place little value in the video and voice of their corporate content. About that, I’m talking about the notion that turning on a smartphone camera is all it takes to produce compelling, thought-provoking, lead generating content that will attract and hold an audience. And what about simply transferring bad presentations into streaming media, thinking that will do the trick?

When is it too late? The moment somebody sees and hears your employees or multimedia content and realizes your prep and production values are garbage. Then hits the off button and tells two friends, who tell two friends…

5. Technology, Across-the-Board

Still running your Commodore 64 corporate laptops on IE7? Using software that’s outdated, not integrated, not maintained, nor supported? Still too cheap to consider the tech tools that can actually make your team more efficient and much more effective in their pursuit of identifying new customers, enabling sales, servicing customers, and winning new business?

The year is 2017, not 2009. The recession is long over and it’s the employees holding the job market cards, not the companies. The time for employees to accept less-than-minimal tech support from companies because of tough economic times and fear of job acquisition or loss is over.

When is it too late? The moment a company starts losing the competitive recruiting and turnover battle for talent.

It’s possible to extensively extend this list and go even further. Chances are that you’re aware of many situations where a company is being cheap at its own risk. Some executives turn away from the business suggestions and pleas from its employees, customers, and partners in order to short-sightedly save a buck or two. Some succeed at getting away with it. Others get away with it until something goes wrong, but then it’s too late and very costly.

Unfortunately, there are those who will only take action when something goes terribly wrong.

United investors and executives had every opportunity to listen and handle their business differently, but they chose another path – no matter what the slick on-board pre-departure videos produced over the years said. Their public relations failed. Their corporate #communications failed. Their #customer relations failed. And yes, they were cheap and arrogant about the whole damn thing.

Play it cheap, and gamble with your own business at your own risk.

Visit: http://www.gettingpresence.com, or email: info@gettingpresence.com